Stora Karlsö

A common murre (Uria aalge) sitting on the rocks of Stora Karlsö

A common murre (Uria aalge) sitting on the rocks of Stora Karlsö

In the summer of 2015, I worked as a nature guide on Stora Karlsö. The island is famous for it’s prolific birdlife and has the only large colony of common murres (Latin: Uria aalge, Swedish: Sillgrissla) and razorbills (Latin Alca torda, Swedish: Tordmule) along with the neighbouring island Lilla Karlsö.

During my time I photographed a lot and here are some of my pictures:

The view from the lime stone rocks on Karlsö is amazing

The view from the lime stone rocks on Karlsö is amazing

A couple of arctic terns. The male is feeding the female while she is laying on the eggs. It is a big colony of Arctic terns breeding on Karlsö every year.

A couple of arctic terns. The male is feeding the female while she is laying on the eggs. It is a big colony of Arctic terns breeding on Karlsö every year.

In may every year, parts of Karlsö is full of orchids. Especially the Early purple orchid (in the picture), and the Elderly flowered orchid.

In may every year, parts of Karlsö is full of orchids. Especially the Early purple orchid (in the picture), and the Elderly flowered orchid.

A close up pictre of the common murre. Research is done every year on the common murres in a unique project to know more about the baltic sea. The photo is taken from the a shelf researchers observe them from.

A close up pictre of the common murre. Research is done every year on the common murres in a unique project to know more about the baltic sea. The photo is taken from the a shelf researchers observe them from.

The water around Karlsö is crystal clear. This picture I took to make the water bottom look like a landscape with trees and grassland. A lesser black-backed gull is flying (Larus fuscus, Swedish Silltrut).

The water around Karlsö is crystal clear. This picture I took to make the water bottom look like a landscape with trees and grassland. A lesser black-backed gull is flying (Larus fuscus, Swedish Silltrut).

Sunrise on Karlsö in May. Birds are still arriving and the eiders are many.

Sunrise on Karlsö in May. Birds are still arriving and the eiders are many.

The researchers on Karlsö, noting down their behaviour.

The researchers on Karlsö, noting down their behaviour.

A common murre flying (Uria aalge). Photographed with a long sutter in order to get the blur.

A common murre flying (Uria aalge). Photographed with a long sutter in order to get the blur.

Looking down from the cliffs on Karlsö, you can see birds flying by the cliff side, about to go out fishing, or feed its chick on the cliff.

Looking down from the cliffs on Karlsö, you can see birds flying by the cliff side, about to go out fishing, or feed its chick on the cliff.

A common murre airborne.

A common murre airborne.

A razor bill streaching its wings

A razor bill streaching its wings

Oystercatcher with its three chicks.

Oystercatcher with its three chicks.

The lighthouse of Karlsö when the sun is setting.

The lighthouse of Karlsö when the sun is setting.

Morning view in May on Karlsö with fields of flowers moving in the wind.

Morning view in May on Karlsö with fields of flowers moving in the wind.

A long exposure picture from Karlsö. In the  horizon you can barely see the wind power-plants. The long exposure makes the mystic shapes of the water.

A long exposure picture from Karlsö. In the horizon you can barely see the wind power-plants. The long exposure makes the mystic shapes of the water.

The beach of Karlsö in night time.

The beach of Karlsö in night time.

A razorbill just taking of from the cliff, about to go to fish in the sea. The birds are the most active during sunset.

A razorbill just taking of from the cliff, about to go to fish in the sea. The birds are the most active during sunset.

A cave that has been used by people since almost 10 000 years, when people first came to Sweden.

A cave that has been used by people since almost 10 000 years, when people first came to Sweden.

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